Erica Ball

CONTACT INFORMATION

eball@fullerton.edu
Voice: 657-278-8273
Fax: 657-278-5820
Dept: 657-278-2441

Cal State University, Fullerton
American Studies
800 N. State College Blvd. UH-313
Fullerton, CA. 92831

OFFICE: UH-411

WEBSITES:

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Erica L. Ball, Ph. D.

Professor of AMST & Chair of African American Studies

Professor Ball is on leave for the 2016-17 academic year.

2002, Ph.D., City University of New York, Graduate Center

1993, B.A., Wesleyan University

RESEARCH AREAS

Slavery and Abolition, Intersectionality, and Race and Popular Culture

COURSES REGULARLY TAUGHT

AMST 201 "Introduction to American Studies"

AMST 320 "Women in American Society"

AMST 401T "Race in American Culture"

AMST 447 "Race in American Popular Culture"

AMST 501 "American Studies Theory and Methods"

AMST 502 "Theorizing Race in American Studies"

PUBLICATIONS

Books

Erica L. Ball, To Live an Antislavery Life: Personal Politics and the Antebellum Black Middle Class. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2012.

Edited Journals:

Erica L. Ball, Melina Pappademos, and Michelle Stephens, editors,Reconceptualizations of the African Diaspora: Radical History Review 103 (Winter 2009). (Received “Honorable Mention” for Best Special Issue of 2009 from the Council of Editors of Learned Journals)

Book Chapters:

“‘Every Man Must Mind His Own Business’: African American Conduct Discourse in the Antebellum Era.” In Jennifer Frost and Kathleen Feeley, eds. When Private Talk Goes Public: Gossip in United States History. NY: Palgrave McMillan, 2014.

Erica L. Ball, "To Train them for the Work: Manhood, Morality, and Black Conduct Discourse in Antebellum New York.” In Timothy Buckner and Peter Caster, eds.Fathers, Preachers, Rebels, Men: Black Masculinity in U.S. History and Literature, 1790-1945. Columbus, OH:Ohio State University Press, 2011: 60-79.

Erica L. Ball, “Conceptualizing the Intersectionality of Race, Class and Gender in U.S. Women’s History.” In Margaret Crocco, Carol Berkin and Barbara Winslow, eds. Clio in the Classroom: Teaching U.S. Women’s History.  NY: Oxford University Press, 2009: 149-161.

Review Essays

“Crossing Boundaries and Creating Community: African American Identity and Politics in Antebellum New York and Washington D.C.” A Review of Leslie M. Harris,In the Shadow of Slavery: African Americans in New York City, 1626-1863 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003), Stanley Harrold, Subversives: Antislavery Community in Washington, D.C., 1828-1865 (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2003), and Shane White, Stories of Freedom in Black New York(Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2002), in The Journal of Urban History 34:6 (September 2008).

Book Reviews

Stephen Tuck, We Ain't What We Ought to Be: the Black Freedom Struggle from Emancipation to Obama (Cambridge: MA, Harvard University Press, 2010), in The Florida Historical Quarterly, vol. 90: 3 (Winter 2012), 381-383.

Alvin F. Oickle, The Man with the Branded Hand: The Life of Jonathan Walker, Abolitionist (Westholme Publishing, 2011), in Civil War Book Review, Fall 2011.

Stephen Kendrick and Paul Kendrick, Sarah’s Long Walk: The Free Blacks of Boston and How Their Struggle for Equality Changed America (Boston: Beacon Press, 2004), in The New England Quarterly, June 2006.

Mark S. Weiner, Black Trials: Citizenship from the Beginnings of Slavery to the End of Caste (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), in Journal of American Ethnic History, Winter/Spring 2006.

Tunde Adeleke, Without Regard to Race: The Other Martin Robison Delany(Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2003), in Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, October 2005.

“Fleshing Out Historical Figures,” Review of Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, eds. African American Lives (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004), in Civil War Book Review, Fall 2004.

“Writing Reconstruction from the Bottom Up,” Review of Wilbert L. Jenkins, Climbing up to Glory: A Short History of African Americans During the Civil War and Reconstruction (Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources, Inc., 2002), on H-CIVWAR, October 2003.

Nell Irvin Painter, Sojourner Truth, a Life, a Symbol (New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1996), in The Psychohistory Review: Studies of Motivation in History and Culture 26, Spring 1998, 284-287.

Other Publications

 “Charlotte L. Forten Grimké” in Junius P. Rodriguez, ed. Encyclopedia of Emancipation and Abolition in the Trans-Atlantic World.  Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, Inc., 2007.

“James Forten, Sr” in Junius P. Rodriguez, ed. Encyclopedia of Emancipation and Abolition in the Trans-Atlantic World.  Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, Inc., 2007.

“Austin Steward” in Junius P. Rodriguez, ed. Encyclopedia of Emancipation and Abolition in the Trans-Atlantic World.  Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, Inc., 2007.

“James W. C. Pennington” in Junius P. Rodriguez, ed. Encyclopedia of Emancipation and Abolition in the Trans-Atlantic World.  Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, Inc., 2007.

“African American Philanthropy,” Philanthropic Trends in the African American, Latino, and Women’s Communities. New York: The Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, The Graduate Center, CUNY, 1999.

“Volunteerism and African-American Women” in Colin Palmer, ed. Curriculum Guide: Topics in Black American Philanthropy Since 1785. New York: Center for the Study of Philanthropy, GSUC-CUNY, 1998.

“Volunteerism and African-American Women” in Kathleen D. McCarthy, ed.Curriculum Guide: Women and Philanthropy in the United States, 1790-1990.  New York: Center for the Study of Philanthropy, GSUC-CUNY, 1998.

SCHOLARLY WORK

Manuscripts in Progress:

Erica L. Ball and Kellie Carter Jackson, eds., Reconsidering Roots: Observations on the 40th Anniversary of a TV Mini-Series that Changed the Way We Understood American Slavery (in preparation).

OFFICE HOURS

None for Fall 2016 semester